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Annotation

Lieberman JA, Hsiao JK. Interpreting the Results of the CATIE Study. Psychiatr Serv . 2006 Jan 1 ; 57(1):139. PubMed Abstract

Comments on Paper and Primary News
Comment by:  Patricia Estani
Submitted 4 February 2006 Posted 6 February 2006
  I recommend this paper

In the comment about the CATIE study, Dr. Ragins described a series of variables, such as the attitudes of the patients toward the medications, that were not included in the discussion of Dr. Lieberman's study in this first CATIE study version. The author of the cited commentary summarized an old rivalry between the "clinical" versus the "scientific and technical" research approach in the field of mental health. I think that, at this time in the development of science, this old opposition (between clinicians and researchers) should not exist anymore.

View all comments by Patricia Estani


Primary News: News Update: What Does CATIE Mean for Treatment?

Comment by:  Marvin Herz
Submitted 7 February 2006 Posted 8 February 2006

I believe that the results of the CATIE study indirectly support the core principle of treatment, that is, it should be comprehensive, using a biopsychosocial approach. The large number of dropouts is but one example of the limitations of relying on antipsychotic medication alone in the treatment of schizophrenia. We know that psychosocial treatments enhance compliance and overall outcome. See, for example, the study that my colleagues and I conducted on relapse prevention in schizophrenia, which had a small number of dropouts over 18 months (Herz et al., 2000).

References:
Herz MI, Lamberti JS, Mintz J, Scott R, O'Dell SP, McCartan L, Nix G. A program for relapse prevention in schizophrenia: a controlled study. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):277-83. Abstract

View all comments by Marvin Herz

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