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Annotation

Stefansson H, Meyer-Lindenberg A, Steinberg S, Magnusdottir B, Morgen K, Arnarsdottir S, Bjornsdottir G, Walters GB, Jonsdottir GA, Doyle OM, Tost H, Grimm O, Kristjansdottir S, Snorrason H, Davidsdottir SR, Gudmundsson LJ, Jonsson GF, Stefansdottir B, Helgadottir I, Haraldsson M, Jonsdottir B, Thygesen JH, Schwarz AJ, Didriksen M, Stensbøl TB, Brammer M, Kapur S, Halldorsson JG, Hreidarsson S, Saemundsen E, Sigurdsson E, Stefansson K. CNVs conferring risk of autism or schizophrenia affect cognition in controls. Nature . 2014 Jan 16 ; 505(7483):361-6. PubMed Abstract

Comments on Paper and Primary News
Primary News: Cognitive Deficits Found in Controls Carrying Neuropsychiatric Risk CNVs

Comment by:  Daniel Weinberger, SRF Advisor
Submitted 19 December 2013 Posted 19 December 2013

The latest important result from the Icelandic population genetic study confirms from a new vantage point what has been clear from over two decades of research: that genetic risk for schizophrenia is associated with cognitive deficits independent of the presence of illness. The earlier work to identify this association included studies of discordant monozygotic twins (Goldberg et al., 1990; Cannon et al., 2000) and more studies of healthy siblings (Egan et al., 2001). These results are consistent with the view that susceptibility genes for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders are genes that influence brain development and function. Cognitive assays are proxies for integrative neural functions that reflect these effects.

The interpretation of the imaging data is less clear, however. While reduced measures of gray matter volume in cingulate and insula have been found in some studies of first-episode psychosis, these findings are not...  Read more


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