Schizophrenia Research Forum - A Catalyst for Creative Thinking

Strength, Timing, and Proper Neuronal Development

1 February 2009. Like the flying trapeze, brain development requires a delicate balance of strength and timing. If either is off, connections fail and the whole act can falter. Two recent Nature papers emphasize as much, and one of them, surprisingly, suggests that getting disrupted development back into the swing of things may be easier than it seems. Both papers may have implications for schizophrenia research.

In the 11 January Nature Genetics online, researchers led by Orly Reiner, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel, and James Lupinski, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, report that overexpression of the gene LIS1 causes brain development problems in both mice and humans. Mutations in LIS1 are known to cause lissencephaly, a developmental brain disorder, but this is the first time researchers have shown that having too much of the lissencephaly 1 protein (the product of the LIS1 gene) can be just as problematic as having too little. LIS1 is of particular interest to schizophrenia researchers because it is a DISC1 binding partner (see SRF related news story). DISC1 mutations have been linked to aberrant neuronal migration and neuronal development (see Kamiya et al., 2005 and SRF related news story), and the DISC1 gene is a strong schizophrenia risk gene candidate (see SRF related news story). The second paper also has a lissencephaly connection. Joseph LoTurco and colleagues at the University of Connecticut in Storrs report that restoring expression of the doublecortin gene (DCX) after birth helps rescue failed neuronal development that occurs in the absence of Dcx. In fact, loss of DCX also causes lissencephaly and leads to epileptic seizures in animals. The researchers show that turning on DCX after birth reduces seizure activity and restores proper neuronal migration. The work, described in the 21 December Nature Medicine online, hints that it may be possible to treat neuronal migration disorders by rebooting neuronal development, even after birth.

Too much of a good thing
Reiner and colleagues made the connection between LIS1 overexpression and development when they identified seven unrelated individuals with duplications of a small region of chromosome 17 (17p13.3) that houses the LIS1 gene. Joint first authors Weimin Bi, Tamar Sapir, Oleg Shchelochkov, and colleagues found that four of those patients carried a duplication of YWHAE, a gene that encodes the protein 14-3-3ε, and that has been associated with schizophrenia (see comment by A. Kamiya). Two patients had a duplication of PAFAH1B1, the gene encoding LIS1, while one patient had a duplication that spanned both genes. Patients carrying the additional PAFAH1B1 gene had more severe abnormalities, including moderate to severely delayed development, reduced cerebral volume, malformation of the corpus callosum, and significant atrophy of the cerebellum.

To test if the extra gene copies are related to the patients’ disabilities, the researchers took two approaches. They first explored whether the extra genes were functional, and found increased expression of LIS1and 14-3-3ε in patients with an extra PAFAH1B1 and YWHAE gene, respectively. They also tested the effect of increasing the copy number in mice. Animals with an extra LIS1 gene also showed developmental problems, with a smaller and anatomically more disorganized brain. These animals had an increase in the number of mitotic cells in the ventricular zone and also an increased number of cells undergoing apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Cells had also lost their polarity, or ability to navigate, a major detriment to proper cell migration. Using time lapse microscopy, the authors found that cell motility was significantly reduced in mice with an extra LIS1 copy. In all, the findings indicate that overexpression of LIS1 causes major setbacks for proper brain development.

Double trouble
Doublecortin may also be essential for cell polarity (see Cardoso et al., 2003), which could explain why it is needed for proper neuronal migration and development. Mutations in DCX lead to a condition called, not surprisingly, double cortex, in which an extra band of gray matter, comprising abnormally migrated neurons, appears between the ventricles and the cortex proper. In humans this causes mild to moderate mental retardation. Pockets of wayward neurons are also found in other human conditions, such as some severe forms of epilepsy that are usually not responsive to pharmacologic intervention, and in a variety of animal models. Many of these conditions, referred to as subcortical band heterotopias in reference to the misplaced neurons, are accompanied by seizures, suggesting that the wayward neuronal migration alters connectivity in such a way that neural networks become hyperexcitable.

LoTurco and colleagues tested whether reactivating cell migration might mitigate disabilities, including seizure, that accompany subcortical band heterotopia (SBH). First author Jean-Bernard Manent and colleagues knocked down Dcx expression in utero in rat pups using RNAi, then conditionally re-expressed Dcx at birth using a construct that lacks the 3’UTR targeted by the RNAi knockdown. The result was pups that had no Dcx between embryonic day 14 and birth, but then had Dcx re-expressed.

The RNAi approach led to pronounced SBH at birth. Neuronal malformations were significantly reduced, however, when Dcx re-expression was induced at birth with neurons actually migrating into the upper layers of the cortex, as in control pups, by P20. Those neurons that migrated to the correct position after postnatal induction of Dcx also appeared morphologically normal, expressing upper cortical layer markers and having a normal looking dendritic tree. The reduction in SBH was accompanied by a dramatic improvement in susceptibility to seizure. At P30, Dcx-re-expressing rats showed the same sensitivity to seizure induction as normal rats of the same age.

The study indicates that it may be possible to correct diseases caused by neuronal migration deficits even after birth. “To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a molecular intervention can reduce the size and functional effects of a pre-existing disruption in neuronal migration,” write the authors. Their strategy, electroporating DNA constructs into the brain in utero, could not be used in humans, however, but the authors suggest possible alternative approaches, including viral transduction of cells with appropriate DNAs, and/or pharmacological intervention that boosts Dcx signaling pathways. Whether either strategy would work in humans is not clear, and it will probably be a long time before either would even be considered. There is also another drawback—the intervention would most likely have to be given before birth because the authors found that if they waited until P5 the strategy was less successful, while at P10 (the equivalent of full-term infants in humans) it failed to mitigate SBH at all. Nevertheless, the finding opens up the possibility that developmental problems stemming from abnormal neural migration could be treated after the fact. It is not clear whether this strategy could ever apply to conditions that emerge in adolescence, such as schizophrenia, which may, at least in part, have a neurodevelopmental etiology. “In general, our study raises the possibility that, in some contexts, neuronal migration is a form of neuronal plasticity that may be engaged to induce neural repair,” write the authors.—Tom Fagan.

References:
Bi W, Sapir T, Shchelochkov OA, Zhang F, Withers MA, Hunter JV, Levy T, Shinder V, Peiffer DA, Gunderson KL, Nezarati MM, Shotts VA, Amato SS, Savage SK, Harris DJ, Day-Salvatore D-L, Horner M, Lu X-Y, Sahoo T, Yanagawa Y, Beaudet AL, Cheung SW, Martinez S, Lupski JR, Reiner R. Increased LIS1 expression affects human and mouse brain development. Nature Genetics advanced online publication. 2009 January 11. Abstract

Manent J-B, Wang Y, Chang YJ, Paramasivam M, LoTurco JJ. Dcx reexpression reduces subcortical band heterotopia and seizure threshold in an animal model of neuronal migration disorder. Nature Medicine advanced online publication. 2008, December 21. Abstract

Comments on Related News


Related News: Messing with DISC1 Protein Disturbs Development, and More

Comment by:  Anil Malhotra, SRF Advisor
Submitted 21 November 2005
Posted 21 November 2005

The relationship between DISC1 and neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder, has now been observed in several studies. Moreover, a number of studies have demonstrated that DISC1 appears to impact neurocognitive function. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms by which DISC1 could contribute to impaired CNS function are unclear, and these two papers shed light on this critical issue.

Millar et al. (2005) have followed the same strategy that they so successfully utilized in their initial DISC1 studies, identifying a translocation that associated with a psychotic illness. In contrast to DISC1, in which a pedigree was identified with a number of translocation carriers, this manuscript is based upon the identification of a single translocation carrier, who appears to manifest classic signs of schizophrenia, without evidence of mood dysregulation. Two genes are disrupted by this translocation: cadherin 8 and phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B). The researchers' elegant set of experiments provides compelling biological evidence that PDE4B interacts with DISC1 and suggests a mechanism mediated by cAMP for DISC1/PDE4B effects on basic molecular processes underlying learning, memory, and perhaps psychosis. It remains possible that PDE4B (and DISC1) are proteins fundamentally involved in cognitive processes, and that the observed relationship to psychotic illnesses represents a final common pathway of neurocognitive impairment. This would be consistent with data from our group (Lencz et al., in press) demonstrating that verbal memory impairment specifically predicts onset of psychosis in at-risk subjects. Similarly, Burdick et al. (2005) found that our DISC1 risk genotypes (Hodgkinson et al., 2004) were associated with impaired verbal working memory. Finally, Callicott et al. (2005) found that a DISC1 risk SNP, Ser704Cys, predicted hippocampal dysfunction, an SNP which we (DeRosse et al., unpublished data) have also found to link with the primary psychotic symptoms (persecutory delusions) manifested by the patient in the Millar et al. study. This body of evidence supports the notion that these proteins play fundamental roles in the key clinical manifestations of schizophrenia.

Kamiya et al. (2005) provide another potential mechanism for these effects, suggesting that a DISC1 mutation may disrupt cerebral cortical development, hinting that studies examining the role of DISC1 genotypes on brain structure and function in the at-risk schizophrenia pediatric patients may be fruitful.

Taken together, these papers add considerable new data suggesting that DISC1 plays a key role in the etiology of schizophrenia, and places DISC1 at the forefront of the rapidly growing body of schizophrenia candidate genes.

References:
Burdick KE, Hodgkinson CA, Szeszko PR, Lencz T, Ekholm JM, Kane JM, Goldman D, Malhotra AK. DISC1 and neurocognitive function in schizophrenia. Neuroreport 2005; 16(12):1399-1402. Abstract

Callicott JH, Straub RE, Pezawas L, Egan MF, Mattay VS, Hariri AR, Verchinski BA, Meyer-Lindenberg A, Balkissoon R, Kolachana B, Goldberg TE, Weinberger DR. Variation in DISC1 affects hippocampal structure and function and increases risk for schizophrenia. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2005; 102(24): 8627-8632. Abstract

Hodgkinson CA, Goldman D, Jaeger J, Persaud S, Kane JM, Lipsky RH, Malhotra AK. Disrupted in Schizophrenia (DISC1): Association with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. Am J Hum Genet 2004; 75:862-872. Abstract

Lencz T, Smith CW, McLaughlin D, Auther A, Nakayama E, Hovey L, Cornblatt BA. Generalized and specific neurocognitive deficits in prodromal schizophrenia. Biological Psychiatry (in press).

View all comments by Anil Malhotra

Related News: Messing with DISC1 Protein Disturbs Development, and More

Comment by:  Angus Nairn
Submitted 29 December 2005
Posted 31 December 2005
  I recommend the Primary Papers

This study describes an interesting genetic link between PDE4B (phosphodiesterase 4B) and schizophrenia that may be related to a physical interaction with DISC1 (disrupted in schizophrenia 1), another gene associated with the psychiatric disorder. The study is highly suggestive of a role for the PDE4B/DISC1 complex in schizophrenia. However, the mechanistic model suggested by the authors whereby DISC1 sequesters PDE4B in an inactive state seems overly speculative, given the results presented in this paper and in prior studies that have examined the regulation of PDE4B by phosphorylation in the absence of DISC1.

View all comments by Angus Nairn

Related News: Messing with DISC1 Protein Disturbs Development, and More

Comment by:  Patricia Estani
Submitted 2 January 2006
Posted 2 January 2006
  I recommend the Primary Papers

Related News: Messing with DISC1 Protein Disturbs Development, and More

Comment by:  Ali Mohammad Foroughmand
Submitted 16 December 2006
Posted 16 December 2006
  I recommend the Primary Papers

Related News: DISC1 Fragment Ties Schizophrenia-like Symptoms to Development in Mice

Comment by:  John Roder
Submitted 30 November 2007
Posted 30 November 2007

Some observations on the new report by Li and colleagues: this work is the first to map subregions of DISC1 and to show that a region that binds Nudel and LIS1 is important in generating schizophrenia-like perturbations in vivo. The authors express DISC1 C-terminus in mice, which interacts with Nudel and LIS1. They showed less native mouse DISC1 associations with Nudel mouse following gene induction. This suggests a dominant-negative mechanism.

No data was shown on native DISC1 levels following induction. Work from the Sawa lab shows that if murine DISC1 levels are reduced in non-engineered mice using RNAi, severe perturbations in development of nervous system are seen (Kamiya et al., 2005); however, behavior was not measured in this study. Severe perturbations would be expected based on the neonatal ventral hippocampal lesion model. In this latter model early brain lesions lead to later impairments in PPI and other behaviors consistent with schizophrenic-like behavior.

They use a promoter only expressed in the forebrain, so it is puzzling they see expression in the cerebellum. Expressed DISC1 bound to endogenous mouse Nudel and LIS1, presumably exerting a dominant-negative effect. Induction of the C-terminus DISC1 at day 7, but not in the adult, led to deficits in working memory, the forced swim test, and sociability. It would have been reassuring if these tasks were validated using antipsychotics and antidepressants. It is not clear in this study why the female C57 was used as a standard opponent mouse, and what genders of DISC1 mice have been used. Even though young C57 females (6 weeks old) were used as neutral partners, the data might be interpreted also as impaired sexual motivation in DISC1-Tg-Tm7 mice.

The authors made an attempt to translate their mouse data (low sociability) into a human population and found an association between DISC1 haplotypes and social impairments in a Finnish population (n = 232 samples), which supports a DISC1 role in social behavior, one of schizophrenia's symptoms. It would be useful to distinguish deficits in social interactions and impaired sexual behavior.

Deficits in working memory are also an important schizophrenia endophenotype, and it would be interesting to measure how specific the cognitive deficit is in DISC1-Tg-Tm-7 mice, estimating associative memory in classical fear conditioning, for example.

Induction of the transgene early in development to day 7 resulted in small changes in dendritic complexity in granule cells in the dentate gyrus. It is surprising larger changes were not observed. The role of DISC1 in the adult self-renewing progenitor cells in the dentate switches, so that DISC1 acts as a brake for dendritic complexity and migration (Duan et al., 2007). Thus, reductions in DISC1 in the adult dentate gyrus granule cells lead to enhanced dendrite growth/complexity.

In the adult, DISC1 was shown to interact with Nudel in controlling adult neurogenesis and development. It is of interest that in the Li et al. paper the transgene also perturbs native DISC1 binding to Nudel at day 7 but not adult. Synaptic transmission was reduced in CA1. It would have been nice to see a recording from dentate granule cells in which changes in dendritic complexity were found.

References:

Kamiya A, Kubo K, Tomoda T, Takaki M, Youn R, Ozeki Y, Sawamura N, Park U, Kudo C, Okawa M, Ross CA, Hatten ME, Nakajima K, Sawa A. A schizophrenia-associated mutation of DISC1 perturbs cerebral cortex development. Nat Cell Biol. 2005 Dec 1;7(12):1167-78. Abstract

Duan X, Chang JH, Ge S, Faulkner RL, Kim JY, Kitabatake Y, Liu XB, Yang CH, Jordan JD, Ma DK, Liu CY, Ganesan S, Cheng HJ, Ming GL, Lu B, Song H. Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 regulates integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain. Cell. 2007 Sep 21;130(6):1146-58. Abstract

View all comments by John Roder

Related News: DISC1 Fragment Ties Schizophrenia-like Symptoms to Development in Mice

Comment by:  Akira Sawa, SRF Advisor
Submitted 3 December 2007
Posted 3 December 2007

DISC1 may be a promising entry point to explore important disease pathways for schizophrenia and related mental conditions; thus, animal models that can provide us with insights into the pathways involving DISC1 may be helpful. In this sense, the new animal model reported by Li et al. (Silva and Cannon’s group at UCLA) has great significance in this field.

They made mice expressing a short domain of DISC1 that may block interaction of DISC1 with a set of protein interactors, including NUDEL/NDEL1 and LIS1. This approach, if the domain is much shorter, will be an important methodology in exploring the disease pathways based on protein interactions. Although the manuscript is excellent, and appropriate as the first report, the domain expressed in the transgenic mice can interact with more than 30-40 proteins, and the phenotypes that the authors observed might not be attributable to the disturbance of protein interactions of DISC1 and NUDEL or LIS1.

Now we have at least five different types of animal models for DISC1, all of which have unique advantages and disadvantages: 1) mice with a spontaneous mutation in an exon, which seem to lack some, but not all, DISC1 isoforms, from Gogos’s lab (see Koike et al., 2006; Ishizuka et al., 2007); 2) mice with mutations induced by a mutagen from Roder’s lab (Clapcote et al., 2007); 3) transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative mutant DISC1 from Sawa’s lab (Hikida et al., 2007); 4) transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative mutant DISC1 in an inducible manner from Pletkinov’s lab (Pletnikov et al., 2007); and 5) the mice from Silva’s and Cannon’s labs.

It is impossible to reach a firm conclusion on how the Scottish mutation of the DISC1 gene leads to molecular dysfunction until the data from autopsied brains of patients in the Scottish family become available. Millar and colleagues have published data of DISC1 in lymphoblastoid cells from the family members and propose an intriguing suggestion of how DISC1 is potentially disturbed in the pedigree (Millar et al., 2005); however, this remains in the realm of hypothesis/suggestion from peripheral cells. Thus, it is very important to compare the various types of DISC1 animal models in approaching how disturbance of DISC1 in brain leads to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders.

References:

Koike H, Arguello PA, Kvajo M, Karayiorgou M, Gogos JA. Disc1 is mutated in the 129S6/SvEv strain and modulates working memory in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Mar 7;103(10):3693-7. Abstract

Ishizuka K, Chen J, Taya S, Li W, Millar JK, Xu Y, Clapcote SJ, Hookway C, Morita M, Kamiya A, Tomoda T, Lipska BK, Roder JC, Pletnikov M, Porteous D, Silva AJ, Cannon TD, Kaibuchi K, Brandon NJ, Weinberger DR, Sawa A. Evidence that many of the DISC1 isoforms in C57BL/6J mice are also expressed in 129S6/SvEv mice. Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Oct ;12(10):897-9. Abstract

Clapcote SJ, Lipina TV, Millar JK, Mackie S, Christie S, Ogawa F, Lerch JP, Trimble K, Uchiyama M, Sakuraba Y, Kaneda H, Shiroishi T, Houslay MD, Henkelman RM, Sled JG, Gondo Y, Porteous DJ, Roder JC. Behavioral phenotypes of Disc1 missense mutations in mice. Neuron. 2007 May 3;54(3):387-402. Abstract

Hikida T, Jaaro-Peled H, Seshadri S, Oishi K, Hookway C, Kong S, Wu D, Xue R, Andradé M, Tankou S, Mori S, Gallagher M, Ishizuka K, Pletnikov M, Kida S, Sawa A. Dominant-negative DISC1 transgenic mice display schizophrenia-associated phenotypes detected by measures translatable to humans. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Sep 4;104(36):14501-6. Abstract

Pletnikov MV, Ayhan Y, Nikolskaia O, Xu Y, Ovanesov MV, Huang H, Mori S, Moran TH, Ross CA. Inducible expression of mutant human DISC1 in mice is associated with brain and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of schizophrenia. Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Sep 11; Abstract

Millar JK, Pickard BS, Mackie S, James R, Christie S, Buchanan SR, Malloy MP, Chubb JE, Huston E, Baillie GS, Thomson PA, Hill EV, Brandon NJ, Rain JC, Camargo LM, Whiting PJ, Houslay MD, Blackwood DH, Muir WJ, Porteous DJ. DISC1 and PDE4B are interacting genetic factors in schizophrenia that regulate cAMP signaling. Science. 2005 Nov 18;310(5751):1187-91. Abstract

View all comments by Akira Sawa

Related News: DISC1 Fragment Ties Schizophrenia-like Symptoms to Development in Mice

Comment by:  David J. Porteous, SRF Advisor
Submitted 21 December 2007
Posted 22 December 2007

On the DISC1 bus
You wait ages for a bus, then a string of them come one behind the other. First, Koike et al. (2006) reported that the 129 strain of mouse had a small detection of the DISC1 gene and this was associated with a deficit on a learning task. The interpretation of this observation was somewhat complicated by the subsequent recognition that the majority, if not all, major DISC1 isoforms are unaffected by the deletion, but this needs further work (Ishizuka et al., 2007). Then, Clapcote et al. (2007) provided a very detailed characterization of two independent ENU-induced mouse missense mutations of DISC1, showing selective brain shrinkage and marked behavioral abnormalities that in one mutant were schizophrenia-like, the other more akin to mood disorder. Importantly, these phenotypes could be differentially rescued by antipsychotics or antidepressants. The main finger pointed to disruption of the interaction with PDE4 to misregulate cAMP signaling (Millar et al., 2005; Murdoch et al., 2007).

Then, back-to-back came two variants of DISC1 transgenic models from Johns Hopkins University (Pletnikov et al., 2007; Hikida et al., 2007) (see also SCZ Forum). Both Pletnikov and Hikida overexpressed a truncated form of DISC1 under the control of the CaMKII promoter (in Pletnikov’s case with an inducible CaMKU promoter). Both groups reported brain structural and behavioral abnormalities that aligned rather nicely with the earlier work of Clapcote et al. (2007). Pletnikov et al. showed that neurite outgrowth was attenuated in primary cortical neurons. They also showed that endogenous DISC1, LIS1, and SNAP25, but not NDEL1 or PSD-95, was reduced in mouse forebrain.

Now, Li et al. (2007) introduce yet another transgenic DISC1 model mouse, this time overexpressing a carboxy tail fragment of DISC1, so the opposite end of the DISC1 molecule from that overexpressed by Pletnikov and by Hikida. Intriguingly, Li et al. (as with all the preceding models) report significant behavioral differences for wild-type littermates. The point of added interest and significance here is that by using an inducible transgenic construct, they could elicit behavioral abnormalities if carboxy terminal DISC1 was expressed on postnatal day 7 only, but not in adult life. What are we to make of this and how do the models align? Li et al. interpret their results to suggest that DISC1 plays a crucial role, through NDEL1 and LIS1, in postnatal (but not adult) brain development. This study obviously raises some key questions. What is the developmental window of DISC1 effect? How can the lack of effect in the adult be reconciled with the rather striking effect on neurogenesis consequent upon downregulation of DISC1 in the adult mouse brain reported by Duan et al. (2007). And if overexpressing 5’ (Hikida, Pletnikov) or 3’ constructs (Li) can elicit similar phenotypes as seen in ENU-induced missense variants within exon 2 (Clapcote), can we come up with a unifying explanation? Perhaps not yet, but these various mouse models certainly emphasize the value of a multi-pronged mouse modeling approach. Combinations of “null,” transgenic, inducible, and missense mutants will help dissect the underlying processes. These studies also suggest that a variety of DISC1 variants in humans might elicit rather similar and also subtly different phenotypes. Indeed, Li et al. try to link their findings on the mouse to human studies, but here I feel there is cause for caution. The genetic association referred to maps to a haplotype in a quite distinct region of DISC1 and the direct or indirect functional effect of the haplotype is far from clear. It is, however, conceptually unlikely that this risk haplotype has a specific or restricted effect on Nudel and/or Lis1 binding. The corollary between a genetic association for a selected, but poorly defined sub-phenotype of schizophrenia with a poorly defined behavioral phenotype in the mouse may be a corollary too far too soon. Finally, whereas the focus of attention by Li, Pletnikov, and Hikida has been on the well-established/neurodevelopmental role of NDEL1 (and LIS1), the potential role of PDE4B both in neurosignaling (related to behavior, learning, and memory) and possibly also neurodevelopment should not be overlooked. In this regard it is noteworthy that PDE4 interacts both with the head and the carboxy tail domain of DISC1 (Hannah et al., 2007) and this most likely contributes to the phenotype in all the models described to date.

References:

Clapcote SJ, Lipina TV, Millar JK, Mackie S, Christie S, Ogawa F, Lerch JP, Trimble K, Uchiyama M, Sakuraba Y, Kaneda H, Shiroishi T, Houslay MD, Henkelman RM, Sled JG, Gondo Y, Porteous DJ, Roder JC. Behavioral phenotypes of Disc1 missense mutations in mice. Neuron. 2007 May 3;54(3):387-402. Abstract

Hikida T, Jaaro-Peled H, Seshadri S, Oishi K, Hookway C, Kong S, Wu D, Xue R, Andradé M, Tankou S, Mori S, Gallagher M, Ishizuka K, Pletnikov M, Kida S, Sawa A. Dominant-negative DISC1 transgenic mice display schizophrenia-associated phenotypes detected by measures translatable to humans. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Sep 4;104(36):14501-6. Abstract

Ishizuka K, Chen J, Taya S, Li W, Millar JK, Xu Y, Clapcote SJ, Hookway C, Morita M, Kamiya A, Tomoda T, Lipska BK, Roder JC, Pletnikov M, Porteous D, Silva AJ, Cannon TD, Kaibuchi K, Brandon NJ, Weinberger DR, Sawa A. Evidence that many of the DISC1 isoforms in C57BL/6J mice are also expressed in 129S6/SvEv mice. Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Oct 1;12(10):897-9. Abstract

Koike H, Arguello PA, Kvajo M, Karayiorgou M, Gogos JA. Disc1 is mutated in the 129S6/SvEv strain and modulates working memory in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Mar 7;103(10):3693-7. Abstract

Li W, Zhou Y, Jentsch JD, Brown RA, Tian X, Ehninger D, Hennah W, Peltonen L, Lönnqvist J, Huttunen MO, Kaprio J, Trachtenberg JT, Silva AJ, Cannon TD. Specific developmental disruption of disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 function results in schizophrenia-related phenotypes in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Nov 13;104(46):18280-5. Abstract

Millar JK, James R, Christie S, Porteous DJ. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1): subcellular targeting and induction of ring mitochondria. Mol Cell Neurosci. 2005 Dec 1;30(4):477-84. Abstract

Duan X, Chang JH, Ge S, Faulkner RL, Kim JY, Kitabatake Y, Liu XB, Yang CH, Jordan JD, Ma DK, Liu CY, Ganesan S, Cheng HJ, Ming GL, Lu B, Song H. Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 regulates integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain. Cell. 2007 Sep 21;130(6):1146-58. Abstract

Murdoch H, Mackie S, Collins DM, Hill EV, Bolger GB, Klussmann E, Porteous DJ, Millar JK, Houslay MD. Isoform-selective susceptibility of DISC1/phosphodiesterase-4 complexes to dissociation by elevated intracellular cAMP levels. J Neurosci. 2007 Aug 29;27(35):9513-24. Abstract

Pletnikov MV, Ayhan Y, Nikolskaia O, Xu Y, Ovanesov MV, Huang H, Mori S, Moran TH, Ross CA. Inducible expression of mutant human DISC1 in mice is associated with brain and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of schizophrenia. Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Sep 11; [Epub ahead of print] Abstract

View all comments by David J. Porteous