Schizophrenia Research Forum - A Catalyst for Creative Thinking
Home Profile Membership/Get Newsletter Log In Contact Us
 For Patients & Families
What's New
Recent Updates
SRF Papers
Current Papers
Search All Papers
Search Comments
News
Research News
Conference News
Plain English
Forums
Current Hypotheses
Idea Lab
Online Discussions
Virtual Conferences
Interviews
Resources
What We Know
SchizophreniaGene
Animal Models
Drugs in Trials
Research Tools
Grants
Jobs
Conferences
Journals
Community Calendar
General Information
Community
Member Directory
Researcher Profiles
Institutes and Labs
About the Site
Mission
History
SRF Team
Advisory Board
Support Us
How to Cite
Fan (E)Mail
The Schizophrenia Research Forum web site is sponsored by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation and was created with funding from the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.
Plain English
back to Plain English Search News Story
Widespread Brain Reductions in "Schizophrenia Lite"

4 March 2013. The brains of men with schizotypal personality disorder, which some researchers consider a mild form of schizophrenia, are pockmarked with areas that are smaller than usual, reports a study published online February 6 in JAMA Psychiatry. Led by Robert McCarley of Harvard Medical School, the brain imaging study implicates a widespread collection of regions in schizotypal personality disorder, ranging from executive centers that control things like attention, to pathways that carry basic information about sight, sound, or touch.

The same regions may also be involved in the more severe illness of schizophrenia. While people with schizotypal personality disorder share symptoms with those with schizophrenia, like social awkwardness or odd beliefs, they never lose touch with reality. They generally work and live independently, and they do not take medication. This means brain changes found in SPD are likely related to schizophrenia-like symptoms, rather than to a lifestyle complicated by illness. (For more details on this study, see SRF related news story.)—Michele Solis.

 
SRF News
SRF Comments
Text Size
Reset Text Size
Share/Bookmark
Copyright © 2005- 2014 Schizophrenia Research Forum Privacy Policy Disclaimer Disclosure Copyright