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Schizophrenia Research Forum: Researcher Profile - Alan Brown
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Researcher Profile - Alan Brown

RESEARCHER INFORMATION
First Name:Alan
Last Name:Brown
Advanced Degrees:M.D., M.P.H.
Affiliation:Columbia University
Department:Psychiatry
Street Address 1:1051 Riverside Drive Unit 23
City:New York
State/Province:NY
Zip/Postal Code:10032
Country/Territory:U.S.A.
Phone:212-543-5629
Fax:212-543-6225
Email Address:asb11@columbia.edu
Disclosure:
(view policy) 
Member reports no financial or other potential conflicts of interest. [Last Modified: 27 January 2011]
View all comments by Alan Brown
Clinical Interests:
Autism spectrum disorders (pervasive developmental disorders), Bipolar disorder , Neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., 22q11 deletion syndromes), Schizophrenia
Research Focus:
Neurodevelopment, Epidemiology, Genetics
Work Sector(s):
University
Web Sites:
Professional: http://asp.cumc.columbia.edu/facdb/profile_list.asp?uni=asb11&DepAffil=Psychiatry
Reasearcher Bio

Alan S. Brown, M.D., M.P.H. is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Clinical Epidemiology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute. Dr. Brown completed psychiatry training at the University of Pittsburght, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in schizophrenia research at Columbia.

His main area of research is on the identification of early antecedents for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. He was the first to demonstrate that serologically documented prenatal exposure to several infectious agents, including influenza, rubella, toxoplasmosis, cytokines were risk factors for schizophrenia.

Dr. Brown is PI on 5 NIH funded studies. These include studies of schizophrenia and autism in a large national Finnish national birth cohort, in collaboration with investigators in Finland, a study of developmental antecedents of bipolar disorder in a large birth cohort in California, and an epidemiologic study of SSRI exposure on childhood and adolescent neuropsychiatric outcomes. In addition, he is investigating the relationship between early developmental insults and neuranatomic and neuropsychological abnormalities in schizophrenia.

Dr. Brown is on the core faculty of several research fellowships and has mentored over 20 trainees. He is the recipient of several awards in clinical psychiatric research, including the A.E. Bennett Research Award, and is a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Dr. Brown is an author or co-author of over 100 research publications.













Top Papers
1. Brown AS, Vinogradov S, Kremem WS, Poole JH, Deicken RF, Penner JD, McKeague IW, Kochetkova A, Kern D, Schaefer CA: Prenatal infection and executive dysfunction in adult schizophrenia. American Journal of Psychiatry 2009;166: 683-690

2. Brown AS, Deicken RF, Vinogradov S, Kremem WS, Poole JH, Penner JD, Kochetkova A, Kern D, Schaefer CA: Prenatal infection and cavum septum pellucidum in adult schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research 2009;108: 285-287

3. Insel BJ, Schaefer CA, McKeague IW, Susser ES, Brown AS: Maternal iron deficiency and the risk of schizophrenia in offspring. Archives of General Psychiatry 2008;65: 1136-1144

4. Perrin MA, Chen H, Sandberg DE, Malaspina D, Brown AS: Growth trajectory during early life and risk of adult schizophrenia. British Journal of Psychiatry 2007;191: 512-520

5. Brown AS, Begg MD, Gravenstein S, Schaefer CA, Wyatt RJ, Bresnahan MA, Babulas V, Susser E. Serologic evidence for prenatal influenza in the etiology of schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2004; 61:774-780.

6. Brown AS, Cohen P, Harkavy-Friedman J, Babulas V, Malaspina D, Gorman JM, Susser ES: A.E. Bennett Research Award. Prenatal rubella, premorbid abnormalities, and adult schizophrenia. Biol Psychiatry 2001;49: 473-486

7. Brown AS. The environment and susceptibility to schizophrenia. Progress in Neurobiology 2010; 93:23-58

8. Ellman LM, Deicken RF, Vinogradov S, Kremen WS, Poole JH, Kern D, Tsai WY, Schaefer CA, Brown AS: Structural brain alterations in schizophrenia following fetal exposure to the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8. Schizophrenia Research 2010; 121:46-54

9. Palmer A, Brown AS, Keegan D, Siska LD, Susser E, Rotrosen J, Bulter PD: Prenatal protein deprivation alters dopamine-mediated behaviors and dopaminergic and glutamatergic receptor binding. Brain Research 2008;1237:62-74.

10. Harper K, Hibbeln JR, Deckelbaum R, Bresnahan M, Quesenberry CA, Schaefer CA, Brown AS: Maternal serum docosahexaenoic acid and schizophrenia in adult offspring. Schizophrenia Research, in press.




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